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Utah Activists File a Lawsuit for Animal Rights


Utah animal welfare activist filed a lawsuit for their right to document the truth about factory farming operations

Animal welfare activists fight for the right to reveal the truth about factory farming operations.

Animal welfare activists in Utah are fighting for the right to know the behind-the-scenes truth about the factory farming industry.

The Animal Legal Defense Fund and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) have teamed up to file a lawsuit that challenges the Utah ‘Ag Gag’ law prohibiting undercover filming while trespassing at farm operations.

Though this Utah law is intended to “protect property rights,” these animal welfare activists claim that such a law restricts their right to free expression and speech. The activists suspect that the law really serves to prevent citizens and organizations from speaking out against the farming operations. Many “special interest profiteers” know that the public would reject the meat and dairy on the market if they saw what happened to the animals in the process of them becoming dinner.

In defending the lawsuit, executive director of the Animal Legal Defense Fund, Stephen Wells, claims that activists have a “right to bring animal cruelty to light.”

Beyond preventing animal abuse, revealing the often-unscrupulous practices of industrial farming sites is crucial for protecting human health, as well. Many of the U.S.’s landmark food safety laws have been passed after activists brought undercover films of livestock operations to the attention of the public.

Research conducted by the American Public Health Association (APHA) have confirmed that factory farms post dangerous threats to human health and the environment by polluting the water and air surrounding the farm and by providing consumers with meat loaded with hormones and antibiotics.

If the lawsuit passes, the Utah animal welfare activists will have taken a giant step forward for animals and humans alike: for more ethical farming operations and healthier food on your dinner table.


Reminder of dark side of animal rights groups

On Feb. 28, 1992, an explosion ripped through Anthony Hall on the campus of Michigan State University. Rodney Coronado, with the help of unnamed co-conspirators, snuck into the building, stole research and then created a pyre from materials found in the building that he ignited with a self-made firebomb. This incident alone cost MSU $1.3 million in lost time, research and physical damage.

It was not a unique protest. Beginning in June of 1991, the Animal Liberation Front attacked a mink farm at Oregon State before firebombing a food cooperative in Edmond, WA. Later that summer, Washington State University’s mink farm was also attacked. Continuing its reign of terror, ALF burned the Oregon Malecky Mink Ranch to the ground in December. The final attack occurred in October of 1992 at Utah State University with another burglary and arson.

Now, 25 years later, the animal rights movement has changed from its fiery beginnings. Yet, it still hasn’t figured out an important thing: how to be humane.

In the decade following the arson at Michigan State, the animal rights movement continued its aggressive tactics. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) gave $70,000 to the legal defense of the arsonist Coronado, and acted as a “media conduit” for the FBI-designated terrorist group Animal Liberation Front. PETA also gave a grant to the Earth Liberation Front, a sister group of the ALF. The FBI calculated in 2004 that ALF/ELF had committed over 1,000 criminal acts and caused $110 million in damages.

The law fought back. In the early 90’s, Congress passed the Animal Enterprise Protection Act to protect those businesses that legitimately used animals, and the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act in 2006 to enhance penalties.

Not long after, a number of animal rights groups, including the Humane Society of the United States and ASPCA, were sued under federal anti-racketeering laws after they were discovered to have secretly paid a witness who lied under oath in a separate lawsuit animal rights activists had brought against a circus. The groups ultimately settled for $25 million.

But they haven’t learned their lesson. Today, animal rights campaigns have embraced tactics that border on economic extortion.

Their new strategy is to threaten companies to comply with their agendas. Animal activists will contact corporate executives and demand that they change their company policies to buy, for instance, only cage-free eggs (this raises the price of eggs for consumers, driving down demand).

If companies don’t comply, they can expect a public smear campaign. PETA launched the “McCruelty” campaign against McDonalds. The Humane Society of the United States similarly attacked IHOP for “animal cruelty” with a large public relations campaign against the chain.

A number of companies have acceded to animal-rights demands to avoid a knee-capping. With long term promises to comply with demands, these business operators push their agreement to source new eggs or meat products several years down the road and get the bullies to go away—at least, temporarily.

However, even a pledge for future compliance doesn’t stop the bullying. The Humane Society got an agreement from Costco and then attacked them for not shifting fast enough to cage-free eggs.

These intimidation campaigns don’t just harm restaurants or supermarkets. They limit choices for consumers, raises prices, and mislead consumers by misrepresenting agricultural practices that are approved of by agriculture scientists and veterinarians.

The irony is animal rights groups don’t want companies to serve cage-free eggs or other “humanely raised” animal protein. They don’t want companies to provide – or consumers to eat – any eggs, meat, or dairy at all. They oppose zoos, aquariums, leather and other ways in which society uses animals.

These groups have not been able to convince the public to adopt their ideas. Only 1-2% of the public is vegan. So they rely on intimidation to push their political aims.

It’s certainly progress that animal rights activists have moved on from arson. The next step is for them to be humane to those who don’t see the world through their distorted lens.


The Dark Side Of Animal Rights

On Feb. 28, 1992, an explosion ripped through Anthony Hall on the campus of Michigan State University. Rodney Coronado, with the help of unnamed co-conspirators, snuck into the building, stole research and then created a pyre from materials found in the building that he ignited with a self-made firebomb. This incident alone cost MSU $1.3 million in lost time, research and physical damage.

It was not a unique protest. Beginning in June of 1991, the Animal Liberation Front attacked a mink farm at Oregon State before firebombing a food cooperative in Edmond, WA. Later that summer, Washington State University’s mink farm was also attacked. Continuing its reign of terror, ALF burned the Oregon Malecky Mink Ranch to the ground in December. The final attack occurred in October of 1992 at Utah State University with another burglary and arson.

Now, 25 years later, the animal rights movement has changed from its fiery beginnings. Yet, it still hasn’t figured out an important thing: how to be humane.

In the decade following the arson at Michigan State, the animal rights movement continued its aggressive tactics. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) gave $70,000 to the legal defense of the arsonist Coronado, and acted as a “media conduit” for the FBI-designated terrorist group Animal Liberation Front. PETA also gave a grant to the Earth Liberation Front, a sister group of the ALF. The FBI calculated in 2004 that ALF/ELF had committed over 1,000 criminal acts and caused $110 million in damages.

The law fought back. In the early 90’s, Congress passed the Animal Enterprise Protection Act to protect those businesses that legitimately used animals, and the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act in 2006 to enhance penalties.

That year, several activists received federal prison sentences for a campaign that involved threatening and intimidating people and employees of targeted businesses.

Not long after, a number of animal rights groups, including the Humane Society of the United States and ASPCA, were sued under federal anti-racketeering laws after they were discovered to have secretly paid a witness who lied under oath in a separate lawsuit animal rights activists had brought against a circus. The groups ultimately settled for $25 million.

But they haven’t learned their lesson. Today, animal rights campaigns have embraced tactics that border on economic extortion.

Their new strategy is to threaten companies to comply with their agendas. Animal activists will contact corporate executives and demand that they change their company policies to buy, for instance, only cage-free eggs (this raises the price of eggs for consumers, driving down demand).

If companies don’t comply, they can expect a public smear campaign. PETA launched the “McCruelty” campaign against McDonalds. The Humane Society of the United States similarly attacked IHOP for “animal cruelty” with a large public relations campaign against the chain.

A number of companies have acceded to animal-rights demands to avoid a knee-capping. With long term promises to comply with demands, these business operators push their agreement to source new eggs or meat products several years down the road and get the bullies to go away—at least, temporarily.

However, even a pledge for future compliance doesn’t stop the bullying. The Humane Society got an agreement from Costco and then attacked them for not shifting fast enough to cage-free eggs.

These intimidation campaigns don’t just harm restaurants or supermarkets. They limit choices for consumers, raises prices, and mislead consumers by misrepresenting agricultural practices that are approved of by agriculture scientists and veterinarians.

The irony is animal rights groups don’t want companies to serve cage-free eggs or other “humanely raised” animal protein. They don’t want companies to provide – or consumers to eat – any eggs, meat, or dairy at all. They oppose zoos, aquariums, leather and other ways in which society uses animals.

These groups have not been able to convince the public to adopt their ideas. Only 1-2% of the public is vegan. So they rely on intimidation to push their political aims.

It’s certainly progress that animal rights activists have moved on from arson. The next step is for them to be humane to those who don’t see the world through their distorted lens.


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PETA is formed and organizes the first World Day for Laboratory Animals protest in the U.S. and the first demonstration against chicken slaughter at Arrow Live Poultry, which was subsequently closed, in Washington, D.C.

PETA conducts an undercover investigation exposing the suffering of the Silver Spring monkeys in a Maryland research facility, resulting in the first-ever police raid on a laboratory.

A PETA undercover investigation results in the first conviction of an experimenter for animal abuse and the first withdrawal of federal research funds because of cruelty to animals.

PETA makes legal history by filing the first-ever lawsuit to become the guardian of animals used in experiments.

PETA gets a U.S. Department of Defense underground “wound lab” shut down and achieves a permanent ban on shooting dogs and cats in military wound laboratories.

PETA closes down a Texas slaughterhouse operation in which 30,000 horses were trucked in and left to starve in frozen fields without shelter.

After PETA publicizes the gross mistreatment of animals at City of Hope in California, the government suspends more than $1 million of the laboratory’s federal funding.

As a result of PETA’s campaign, the SEMA research laboratory in Maryland stops confining chimpanzees to isolation chambers.

PETA stops a plan by Cedars-Sinai, California’s largest hospital, to ship stray dogs from Mexico to California for experiments.

For the first time, PETA conducts a year-long undercover investigation at Biosearch, a cosmetics and household product testing laboratory, uncovering more than 100 violations of federal and state anti-cruelty laws.

PETA President Ingrid Newkirk addresses some of the 35,000 people attending PETA’s Animal Rights Music Festival at the Washington Monument on June 11, 1988. It’s a breakthrough event that puts PETA on the pop-culture radar screen, with extensive coverage on MTV, thanks to headliners The B-52s, Natalie Merchant, and Howard Jones.

PETA persuades Avon, Benetton, Mary Kay, Amway, Kenner, Mattel, and Hasbro to stop testing on animals. Note: Many of these companies have started testing on animals again in order to sell their products in China.

After PETA exposes the backstage beating of orangutans by Las Vegas entertainer Bobby Berosini, his wildlife permit is suspended and his show closes.

PETA’s first sensational vegetarian commercial is “Meat Stinks” with Grammy winner k.d. lang in July 1990. The spot gets her banned on country radio networks but draws such massive coverage that her album goes gold! Her gold record still adorns the walls of the Sam Simon Center, PETA’s Virginia headquarters.

PETA’s “Silver Spring monkeys” case marks the first animal experimentation case ever heard by the U.S. Supreme Court.The court gives a unanimous, positive ruling

PETA’s undercover investigation into foie gras production prompts the first-ever police raid on a factory farm. PETA convinces many restaurants to stop selling the vile product.

PETA’s “Rather Go Naked Than Wear Fur” campaign is launched on the streets of Tokyo outside a Japanese fur expo on February 18, 1992. Led by PETA staff member Dan Mathews and Julia Sloane, the protest makes headlines around the world and leads to PETA’s iconic naked celebrity ad series.

All car-crash tests on animals stop worldwide following PETA’s hard-hitting campaign against General Motors’ use of live pigs and ferrets in crash tests.

A California furrier is charged with cruelty to animals after a PETA investigator films him electrocuting chinchillas by clipping wires to the animals’ genitals. In another undercover exposé, PETA catches a fur rancher on videotape causing minks to die in agony by injecting them with a weedkiller. Both fur farms agree to stop these cruel killing methods.

Less than a month after PETA supporters occupy Calvin Klein‘s office in New York—an action that leads to a meeting between the designer and a PETA representative—Klein announces that he will no longer design with fur, the first major fashion designer to do so.

PETA persuades Mobil, Texaco, Pennzoil, Shell, and other oil companies to cover their exhaust stacks after showing how millions of birds and bats have become trapped in them and been burned to death.

PETA’s efforts lead to the first-ever cruelty charges filed against a factory farmer for cruelty to chickens for allowing tens of thousands of chickens to starve to death. The president of the company ultimately pleads guilty.

Following PETA’s campaign, NASA pulls out of Bion—a joint U.S., French, and Russian experiment in which monkeys wearing straitjackets were to have electrodes implanted in their bodies and be launched into space.

PETA convinces Gillette to observe a moratorium on animal testing after a colorful years-long campaign, including the presentation of shareholder resolutions at Gillette’s annual meetings and support from compassionate celebrities Paul McCartney, Lily Tomlin, Hugh Grant, and Elizabeth Hurley.

A PETA investigation that documented the anal electrocution of foxes leads to the first-ever guilty plea by a fur rancher to cruelty-to-animals charges.

PETA succeeds in getting Taiwan to pass its first-ever law against cruelty to animals after the group rescues countless dogs from being beaten, starved, electrocuted, and drowned in Taiwan’s pounds.

Undercover investigations into pig-breeding factory farms in North Carolina and Oklahoma reveal horrific conditions and daily abuse of pigs, including the fact that one pig was skinned alive, leading to the first-ever felony indictments of farm workers.

PETA conducts an undercover investigation into the Nielsen Farmspuppy mill in Kansas, which reveals extremely small enclosures and rampant sickness, abuse, and death. Our investigation leads to the closure of the facility and a $20,000 fine from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The Nielsens are also “permanently disqualified from being licensed” by the USDA.

PETA’s grassroots campaign, Congressional testimony, and scientific documentation drive the White House and the EPA to spare 800,000 animals from chemical toxicity testing in the high production volume chemical-testing program.

Following the group’s investigation, PETA convinces Gap Inc., J.Crew, Liz Claiborne, Clarks, and Florsheim to boycott leather from India and China, countries in which leather production causes immense animal suffering.

After a campaign that lasts 11 months and includes more than 400 demonstrations at McDonald’s restaurants in more than 23 countries, as well as advertising and celebrity involvement, McDonald’s becomes the first fast-food company to agree to make basic animal-welfare improvements for farmed animals.

PETA persuades Burger King to adopt sweeping animal-welfare improvements, including conducting unannounced slaughterhouse inspections and giving hens more cage space.

Shortly thereafter, following a vigorous PETA campaign, Wendy’s follows suit, announcing plans to change some of its rules regarding the handling and slaughter of the animals used for its food.

PETA’s efforts lead to the confiscation of six undernourished polar bears from a tropical circus, in which they were underfed, whipped, and forced to perform in sweltering temperatures.

Evidence submitted by PETA leads to the mandatory relinquishment of all 16 elephants used by the Hawthorn Corporation, an elephant-rental company.

PETA persuades chemical companies and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to drop plans for numerous painful chemical tests, sparing tens of thousands of animals.

Following PETA’s campaign, Honda, PUMA, Keds, and other companies pull their commercials featuring great apes. Several corporations pledge never to use great apes in advertising in the future.

Thanks to PETA’s lengthy campaign to push PETCO to take more responsibility for the animals in its stores, the company agrees to stop selling large birds and to make provisions for the millions of rats and mice in its care.

PETA convinces Polo Ralph Lauren to stop selling fur. The furs were pulled from store shelves and donated to those in need in Mongolia.

After uncovering cruel experiments funded by major beverage manufacturers, PETA convinces POM Wonderful, PepsiCo, and Coca-Cola to end all animal tests.

PETA elicits agreements to make major improvements in farmed-animal welfare from Safeway, Harris Teeter, and the company that controls the purchase of chickens for KFCs in Canada, which also start offering faux-chicken menu items.

The Ad Council signs PETA’s Great Ape Humane Pledge. In 2012, it extends its pledge to include a ban on all wild animals in advertising.

PETA’s investigation into Aviagen Turkeys, Inc., part of the self-proclaimed “world’s leading poultry breeding company,” reveals that workers tortured, mutilated, and maliciously killed turkeys. Three former employees are indicted on felony cruelty-to-animals charges—the first felony charges for abusing factory-farmed poultry in U.S. history—and two become the first factory farmers to be convicted of abusing turkeys. One man is sentenced to one year in jail—the strongest penalty levied for abusing a factory-farmed animal in U.S. history—and all three are barred from owning or living with animals for five years.

PETA investigates a pig-breeding factory farm in Iowa and uncovers horrific treatment of sows, boars, and piglets. The manager of the farm is fired, and the evidence results in 22 criminal charges against six workers, all of whom admit guilt and are sentenced to serve up to two years’ probation.

PETA’s investigation into animal dealer U.S. Global Exotics prompts the largest animal seizure in history—more than 26,000 animals. The owner flees the country to evade federal charges

After receiving the video of PETA’s exposé of extreme suffering in the trade in exotic-animal skins, Stockholm-based international retailer H&M becomes the first retailer to adopt a policy banning products made from exotic skins in all of its 1,800 stores worldwide

After nearly a month of intense PETA campaigning against horrific combat training exercises conducted by the Bolivian military—in which live dogs are shown in a video tied down, repeatedly stabbed, and screaming in agony—the Bolivian Ministry of Defense ends the killing by issuing the military’s first-ever animal protection regulation, which “prohibit[s] all acts of violence, exploitation, [and] mistreatment that provokes the death of animals.”

European Chemicals Agency spares up to 4.5 million animals from toxicity testing in a massive EU testing program after receiving documentation provided by PETA scientists.

A petition co-filed by PETA leads a court to determine that University of Wisconsin–Madison staff members may face prosecution for violating state law by killing sheep in decompression experiments.

After discussions with PETA, Japan’s ITO EN, Ltd.—the world’s largest green-tea manufacturer—institutes a new policy prohibiting all animal testing. Also after discussions with PETA, Lipton tea soon follows suit.

Following a year of vigorous campaigning, NASA cancels plans for a $1.75 million study in which dozens of squirrel monkeys would have been exposed to a harmful dose of radiation.

Just one week after PETA releases the results of its shocking undercover investigation into Professional Laboratory and Research Services and files a complaint with the USDA, the North Carolina–based contract animal testing facility surrenders nearly 200 dogs and more than 50 cats and closes its doors. This is only the second time in U.S. history that a laboratory has been forced to surrender animals and shut down.

Less than six months after PETA releases its undercover investigation into laboratories at the University of Utah, Utah legislators vote overwhelmingly to amend an archaic state law so that government-run animal shelters will no longer be forced to sell dogs and cats to laboratories on demand.

The USDA fines Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus $270,000—the largest fine ever paid by an animal exhibitor—for violations of the Animal Welfare Act after PETA presents the agency with unequivocal evidence of animal abuse, including beatings, the negligent death of a lion, lame elephants forced to perform despite chronic pain, and a baby elephant who died during a training routine.

PETA blows the lid off Ringling Bros.violent training methods when a whistleblower shares photographic evidence from Ringling’s training compound revealing how baby elephants are torn away from their mothers and subjected to violent training sessions so that they will learn how to perform tricks.

PETA releases video footage from an investigation showing how elephants used by Ringling Bros. are whipped, beaten, and yanked by heavy, sharp steel-tipped bullhooks behind the scenes prior to performing.

In the first case of its kind, PETA, three marine-mammal experts, and two former orca trainers file a lawsuit asking a federal court to declare that five wild-caught orcas forced to perform at SeaWorld are being held as slaves in violation of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The filing—the first ever seeking to apply the 13th Amendment to nonhuman animals—names the five orcas as plaintiffs and seeks their release into their natural habitats or seaside sanctuaries.

After intensive campaigning by PETA, the U.S. military ends the use of monkeys in the Army’s cruel chemical-attack training course.

Our look into ferret dealer Triple F Farms, Inc., (the first-ever such exposé) leads to more than $44,000 in federal fines and payments.

All the top 10 advertising agencies in the United States—McCann Erickson, BBDO, Y&R, DDB, Ogilvy & Mather, TBWA, Draftfcb, Grey, JWT, and Campbell Ewald – sign PETA’s Great Ape Humane Pledge, banning the use of great apes in their advertising.

After meeting with PETA, apparel and accessories company Haband removes all down-filled items from among its offerings and becomes the first company to implement an official policy banning the sale of down feathers.

After PETA donates simulators to Egypt, the country ends all use of animals for medical trauma training.

PETA exposes disturbing video footage taken by a whistleblower during a trauma training session conducted by military contractor Tier 1 Group for members of the U.S. Coast Guard, which shows the stabbing, shooting, and dismemberment of live goats. Following an official complaint from PETA, the USDA cites Tier 1 Group for violating the federal Animal Welfare Act for failing to provide the goats with adequate anesthesia before they were mutilated.

After two years of PETA campaigns and a lengthy lawsuit brought by PETA and local residents, the Supreme Court of Puerto Rico nixes a plan by the Bioculture corporation to set up a monkey-breeding facility and sell monkeys to U.S. laboratories.

By funding scientists to train Chinese government officials in the use of non-animal testing methods, PETA launches an effort to stop China from requiring tests on animals for cosmetics and household products. As part of its effort, PETA convinces cosmetics company Urban Decay to reverse its decision to sell its products in China, and John Paul Mitchell Systems pulls out of the Chinese market rather than having its products tested on animals.

PETA’s exposé documenting that cosmetics companies were secretly paying for tests on animals in China and our funding of scientists to train officials there lead to that nation’s acceptance, by the end of 2012, of its first non-animal tests for cosmetics ingredients.

Following PETA’s investigations and campaign, a sweeping set of reforms is introduced and accepted by many horse-racing tracks, including softer whips and limitations on whipping, increased drug testing, and mandatory horse ambulances on the track.

Our Caboodle Ranch, Inc., hoarder case leads to the seizure of 700 cats (among the most ever in U.S. history), felony cruelty charges, and the closure of the ranch.

The horse-racing industry implements its first-ever industry-supported retirement plan for thoroughbreds.

The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission bans the use of furosemide, or Lasix, a commonly used drug that can mask other drugs and lead to horse breakdowns.

After decades of conducting cruel experiments and just six months after PETA purchases stock in the company in order to introduce a shareholder resolution on animal testing, BIOQUAL announces that it will end its use of chimpanzees. Formerly known as SEMA, BIOQUAL was first exposed in 1986, when PETA released footage of chimpanzees locked inside tiny isolation chambers at the facility.

After two horses die on the set of the HBO horse-racing series Luck, PETA goes public with information obtained by whistleblowers as well as necropsy reports from the racing board revealing that older, arthritic horses had been used in dangerous and deadly racing sequences and that the horses appeared not to have been provided with adequate protection. After a third horse dies on the set, HBO announces the cancellation of Luck and ceases all production on the series.

After a long and hard-fought battle by PETA, the Animal Legal Defense Fund, and concerned citizens, Ben the bear is rescued from abhorrent conditions at a North Carolina roadside zoo. FedEx transports Ben free of charge (dubbing the mission “Bear Force One”) to the Performing Animal Welfare Society’s beautiful accredited wildlife sanctuary in northern California. There, Ben will live out the rest of his days splashing in his own pool, basking in the sun, and rolling in the grass in a 2-acre habitat designed especially for him.

After a two-month PETA undercover investigation documenting that thousands of animals were being neglected and dying and many more are being cruelly killed, law-enforcement officials raid Global Captive Breeders—a company in Lake Elsinore, California, that bred and sold reptiles and rats for the “pet” trade. This results in the largest rescue of neglected rats in U.S. history and the largest seizure of animals, including more than 600 reptiles and 18,000 rats, ever in California. Local authorities charge the owner and manager with a total of 223 felony cruelty-to-animals and related charges.

PETA prevails in a lawsuit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for illegally issuing captive-bred wildlife permits. This victory allows PETA to keep a closer eye on animals bred in captivity, weigh in on permit applications, and bring legal challenges against permits that are improperly issued to Ringling Bros., SeaWorld, Have Trunk Will Travel, and other animal abusers.

After years of imprisonment in concrete pits at Chief Saunooke Bear Park in Cherokee, North Carolina, 11 bears were finally freed following a years-long campaign and PETA undercover investigation that forced the roadside zoo to pay a fine and surrender its exhibitor’s license to settle more than a dozen charges for violations of the Animal Welfare Act. After a private benefactor generously offered to purchase the bears, they were quickly transferred to their new home at the International Exotic Animal Sanctuary in Dallas, where they can now walk through tall grass, dig in the dirt, climb trees, take a dip in a pond, and just live as bears are supposed to live.

After a whistleblower works with us on our Southern Quality Meats, Inc., case, the U.S. Department of Agriculture cites the facility for violating federal law. As a result, the slaughterhouse shuts down.

PETA—along with the Animal Legal Defense Fund, investigative journalists, a political journalist, a university history professor, and animal rights advocate Amy Meyer, who had recently been arrested for filming a downed cow at a Utah slaughterhouse—files a groundbreaking lawsuit challenging Utah’s “ag-gag” law, which prohibits the documenting of animal abuse at agricultural operations. The plaintiffs contend that this agribusiness law amounts to an unconstitutional attack on investigators’ First Amendment rights.

Following decades of campaigning by PETA, the U.S. Army announces that it will reduce its use of animals for deadly trauma training exercises and restrict training for many military personnel to exclusively modern non-animal methods.

After hearing from PETA that many sheep used for their wool endure a painful procedure called “mulesing,” in which huge chunks of skin and flesh are cut from their backsides without any painkillers, more than 50 national and international clothing retailers, including Abercrombie & Fitch, Liz Claiborne, H&M, Kenneth Cole, Perry Ellis International, and Express, state that they will use wool that comes only from nonmulesed sheep, as the industry begins to phase out the cruel practice.

The scientific and regulatory expertise of PETA and its affiliates are consolidated to form the PETA International Science Consortium Ltd. Accepted as an accredited stakeholder with the agency that oversees the largest chemical testing program in the world, the Science Consortium works with industry, private research facilities and governments to promote non-animal tests around the world.

Following PETA’s efforts to end dehorning in the dairy industry, in which calves have their horn buds burned off with no pain relief, companies such as Chipotle, Peet’s Coffee & Tea, and Amy’s Kitchen begin to pressure their suppliers to stop this cruel mutilation. Aurora Organic Dairy, the leading producer of private-brand organic milk and butter, is now breeding exclusively with bulls who carry the hornless gene.

In 2013, the Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously to support a bullhook ban showing PETA’s undercover footage of baby elephant training during the hearing. The ban, which goes into effect in 2017, is the first to pass in a major city where Ringling Bros. travels.

Our Osborne Farm, Inc., case causes the dairy farm to be cited for violating state law and then to close (the first such closure following an exposé).

Following PETA’s groundbreaking investigation from 2010, three pigeon racing organizers pleaded no contest to charges of commercial gambling—the first time in history that anyone has been held responsible for illegal conduct associated with cruel pigeon races.

PETA’s 2013 exposé of Taiwan’s pigeon racing industry resulted in a national sweep of pigeon racing clubs. Police confiscated cash and equipment and froze over $4.5 million of apparent illegal gambling proceeds in two clubs’ bank accounts.

The first ever undercover investigation into the angora wool industry showed screaming rabbits being tied down and their fur ripped from their bodies, leading to a ban on its sale by more than 70 companies from around the world including H&M, Calvin Klein, and Tommy Hilfiger.

In the wake of the 2013 release of the film Blackfish and PETA’s relentless campaign against marine animal abusement park SeaWorld reached a fever-pitch. As a result, public condemnation of SeaWorld led to a tanking stock price, and the company’s attendance, revenue, and profits continued to plummet.

I, Chicken, the first-ever empathy-building virtual-reality experience—which allows people to view life from a chicken’s perspective before being sent to slaughter—travels to more than 150 universities across the US, including Harvard, Stanford, Brown, Dartmouth, the University of Pennsylvania, and Princeton.

After intensive efforts led by PETA India and with scientific support from PETA US and the PETA International Science Consortium Ltd., India officially bans animal-tested cosmetics from being imported into the country. PETA India rallied support from scientists, ethical companies, celebrities, and powerful Indian government leaders.

In a first of its kind, international exposé of the wool industry in both Australia and the US, PETA released shocking footage of sheep-shearers punching, stomping, and cutting gentle sheep—some of whom died and were kicked and dragged aside like garbage.

Following an extensive PETA campaign to expose and end cruel and archaic brain experiments on cats at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, the federal grant money expired, the lead experimenter retired, and the embattled laboratory closed its doors for good. The remaining four cats in the laboratory were adopted into private homes.

After 35 years of PETA protests against cruelty to elephants in circuses, Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus announced that in response to growing public concern over “how the animals are treated,” it will end elephant performances by 2018. PETA also caught Ringling’s abuse on video and released to the world a former Ringling trainer’s photos of the circus’s violent baby-elephant training.

PETA launched a tour of its new “I, Orca” empathy project, which uses wireless Google virtual reality goggles to immerse participants in a world where they can swim freely in the ocean with their orca family. They will also meet an orca mother (voiced by Nurse Jackie star Edie Falco) who still mourns the baby who was stolen from her decades ago and sent to SeaWorld, where he has been sentenced to a miserable life in captivity. PETA took “I, Orca” on tour to cities near all three SeaWorld parks in the hope that after tourists and locals experience firsthand that SeaWorld means a lifetime of suffering for captive animals, they’ll choose to stick to animal-friendly entertainment.

Our first exposé in Argentina causes Patagonia to drop its wool supplier.

After our Deployment Medicine International trauma training case, the contractor is barred from all federal contracts for 15 years.

Following PETA’s exposé, the National Institutes of Health ends more than 50 years of infant-monkey maternal-separation studies.

PETA secures the first conviction for the production and distribution of disturbing “crush videos,” after supplying evidence to law-enforcement officials in Houston and encouraging federal authorities to press charges against Ashley Nicole Richards for violating the Federal Animal Crush Video Prohibition Act of 2010.

PETA files a groundbreaking lawsuit asking a U.S. federal court to declare Naruto—a free-living crested macaque—the author and owner of the internationally famous “monkey selfie” photograph, which he took using a photographer’s unattended camera. The aim is to get the court to declare a nonhuman animal the owner of property (the copyright of the photograph), rather than a mere piece of property himself.

In a landmark victory, PETA succeeds in getting a federal court to strike down Idaho’s “ag-gag” law as an unconstitutional violation of the First and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution. This is the first time that a court has declared an “ag-gag” statute unconstitutional.

After 35 years of PETA protests against cruelty to elephants in circuses, Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus ends elephant performances and takes the elephants off the road in response to growing public concern over “how the animals are treated.”

After years of intense PETA-led campaigns—including demonstrations, celebrity outreach, and our cutting-edge “I, Orca” virtual reality project—SeaWorld announces that it will end its orca-breeding program. This means that the current generation of orcas imprisoned in SeaWorld’s tanks will be the last.

Following appeals from PETA scientists, the Indian government changes its drug testing requirements to avoid duplicative testing on animals for new drugs and saves many thousands of animals from laboratory experiments.

Following a PETA campaign that saw the end of year-long pesticide poisoning tests on dogs in 2007 in the U.S. and in 2013 in the E.U, PETA scientists succeeded in also convincing the Canadian government to end this testing, thus sparing hundreds of dogs from being forced to eat pesticide-laced food or inhale pesticide fumes every day for a year before being killed and dissected.

PETA scientists’ work with EPA and industry results in EPA announcement to reduce – and ultimately – eliminate the use of animals in lethal testing in which animals receive toxic doses of pesticides on their skin and in their eyes as well as being fed or forced to inhale these chemicals.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) formally announced its plan to incorporate results from non-animal methods in its Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program as a step towards its stated goal of developing a set of in vitro methods to replace all animal studies in the program. The EDSP, as it is known, requires the testing of more than 10,000 chemicals for possible effects on the body’s hormonal systems, and in its original form, had the potential to kill millions of animals. EPA’s announcement means the agency is largely following the roadmap that PETA scientists have laid out for the program over the past decade through ongoing meetings with EPA, participation in working groups, submission of numerous technical documents, and the publication of several articles.

Following a PETA India investigation documenting the abuse of thousands of horses, donkeys, and mules in antitoxin production, the PETA International Science Consortium funds the development of a non-animal replacement for the diphtheria antitoxin, ordinarily made by repeatedly injecting horses with toxins and drawing large volumes of their blood.

After years of PETA campaigning, funding and promoting non-animal testing methods, The Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21 st Century Act is signed into law. By modernizing the American system of chemical toxicity testing and requiring, for the first time, that the Environmental Protection Agency reduce and replace the use of animals, the law will spare tens of thousands of animals the agony of chemical testing.

Following years of complaints from PETA, the USDA revokes the exhibitor license of The Mobile Zoo in Alabama. As a result, neither the facility nor its operator can ever again legally exhibit warm-blooded animals—the only ones covered under the federal Animal Welfare Act.

In a landmark case following the release of a PETA exposé, at least six shearers were charged with a minimum of 70 counts of cruelty to animals for the first time in history. The exposé documented that wool industry workers in Australia beat scared sheep in the face with electric clippers and punched and stomped on their heads and necks. The first five defendants pleaded guilty. The first to be sentenced was banned from shearing or being in charge of farmed animals for two years.

Until recently, rats were being used in cruel experiments to test—of all things—raspberries. The National Processed Raspberry Council and the Washington Red Raspberry Commission had been funding misguided experiments that looked at the effects of raspberries on everything from diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease to balance and coordination. But following discussions with PETA, both groups have confirmed that they will no longer fund experiments on animals.

Citing a “dramatic drop” in ticket sales, Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus announced that it was shutting down after 146 years. PETA has targeted Ringling for over three decades, holding protests outside every performance publicizing photos and videos showing trainers beating, striking, hooking, whipping, and roughly handling animals and lobbying for bans on bullhooks and animal performances. We filed more than 130 formal complaints against the circus with the USDA, met with the agency numerous times, and documented gross neglect, prolonged chaining, and animal deaths—including those of a baby elephant who died after breaking his legs during training, another who was forced to perform while fatally ill, and a lion who died of heatstroke in a Ringling boxcar.

PETA pressed, and we got results: Multibillion-dollar pharmaceutical and medical-device maker Sanofi has committed to not killing animals anymore in training sessions for sales personnel. This comes after PETA uncovered evidence that the company was using live animals to demonstrate invasive medical-device procedures for sales representatives.

Hundreds of animals in four developing countries will no longer be cut apart and killed in medical training courses, thanks to PETA’s donation of eight state-of-the-art TraumaMan surgical simulators, worth $200,000. This brings the total number of countries that have ended the use of dogs, pigs, goats, and sheep for crude medical training to 20, following our donations of more than 100 TraumaMan simulators worth close to $3 million over the last three years.

Following an extensive, nearly four-year campaign by PETA, the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) announced that it’s ending its use of animals for trauma training. This means no more cutting holes into the throats, chests, or limbs of live pigs and sheep. Thousands of people sent e-mails to RACS officials through PETA’s online action alert, more than 100,000 people signed a PETA Australia petition, and thought-provoking ads and protests featured numerous outspoken “pigs.”

Following pressure from PETA and U.S. Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Calif.), the U.S. Coast Guard has become the first branch of the military to suspend the shooting, stabbing, and killing of animals in trauma training drills while it studies available human simulators and other non-animal training methods that could be used instead. The Coast Guard confirmed that the moratorium came into effect after a PETA exposé prompted an official review by the agency.

Just weeks after PETA contacted House Foods to ask it to stop conducting experiments on animals, the company ended its long-standing practice of force-feeding mice and injecting them with chemicals in order to make health claims about its products. House Foods’ animal tests date back to 1996.

Following discussions with PETA, Wells Fargo ended its nearly 30-year sponsorship of the cruel and deadly Iditarod dog race. Months later, the cash-strapped event cut its purse by $250,000.

Working with the company Good Clean Love, PETA convinces the US Food and Drug Administration to accept results from simple non-invasive skin tests on human volunteers instead of requiring that rabbits and guinea pigs be injected with lubricants. This precedent-setting ruling not only spared the lives of the specific animals who would have been used, but sets a clear guide to allow other companies to also use tests that don’t require animals.

In just five years, PETA rescues its 60 th bear. These bears were living in cages or filthy, cramped concrete pits at roadside zoos across the country. Now they can roam enriching habitats that are measured in acres, not feet.

In the June 2017 issue of Corporate Counsel magazine, the PETA Foundation earned the magazine’s prestigious Best Legal Department of 2017 honor. In the history of the award, only one other nonprofit organization has ever won, and we are the first animal advocacy organization to earn the title. The magazine stated that the PETA Foundation attorneys have “fundamentally shifted the animal law landscape in this country.”

In July, the U.S. District Court of Utah declared Utah’s ag-gag statue unconstitutional, finding that it violates the First Amendment’s free speech protections. The law was targeted specifically at PETA and undercover investigations, and prohibited gaining access to agricultural operations by false pretenses, such as by lying on an employment application, and filming once inside. This is the second time that a state ag-gag statue has been declared unconstitutional as a result of a lawsuit filed by PETA and others, and is a crucial victory to ensure that we can continue informing the public about the egregious cruelty that animals suffer behind closed doors.

Following a 10-year PETA campaign that included three eyewitness investigations in South America, Israel has banned the import of beef from slaughterhouses that use the archaic and cruel “shackle and hoist” method of kosher slaughter.

The PETA International Science Consortium co-hosts workshops and webinar series to develop replacements to using animals in inhalation toxicity testing and awards $400,000 worth of in vitro inhalation exposure equipment to four laboratories that will provide inhalation testing to companies without the use of animals for the first time.

After several years of campaigning on behalf of a suffering elephant named Nosey, PETA rejoiced when Alabama authorities seized her from her neglectful handler, Hugo Liebel. She had been routinely forced to give rides and perform despite her aching, arthritic joints, but she’s now receiving the respite and care that she deserves at an accredited elephant sanctuary.

General Mills agreed to ban all experiments on animals for the purpose of making health claims about its foods after talks with PETA about the cruelty of animal studies and their irrelevance to humans.

Following years of pressure from PETA and U.S. Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Calif.), the U.S. Coast Guard has become the first branch of the military to end the shooting, stabbing, dismembering, and killing of animals in trauma training drills. In public records obtained by PETA, the agency confirmed the ban in writing, adding that it will now use superior medical simulators in these training exercises.

After PETA’s exposé led to the closure of The Pet Blood Bank in Texas, a filthy dog blood farm, and the rescue of 151 greyhounds, the greyhound racing industry adopted long-overdue standards on blood banks. The National Greyhound Association barred its members from directly sending greyhounds to any blood bank operation, established rules for the length of time dogs can be used for their blood, and requires spaying or neutering, veterinary exams, and subsequent adoption.

PETA helped rescue 39 tigers, three bears, two baboons, and two chimpanzees from a hellhole roadside zoo operated by “Joe Exotic” of Tiger King infamy. All 46 animals were transferred to reputable sanctuaries.

The Japanese government stops requiring year-long pesticide poisoning tests on dogs, sparing hundreds of dogs. The move came after PETA scientists provided extensive scientific support for doing so over the course of three years. Japan joins the U.S., the E.U., and Canada in dropping this requirement after urging from PETA.

On March 2, 2017, we filed a complaint alleging that the city of Arcadia violated the California Environmental Quality Act when it adopted a program to trap and kill coyotes without first assessing the environmental impact that such actions would have. On April 4, the City Council rescinded its prior adoption and allocation of funds for the trapping program—which effectively mooted the substance of our case.

After decades of campaigning against fur, we’ve reached a tipping point: Hundreds of major companies have banned it—including high-end designers Giorgio Armani, Gucci, John Galliano, Donna Karan, Donatella Versace, Michael Kors, and Jimmy Choo—and InStyle became the first major fashion magazine to ban it. Meghan Markle, the Duchess of Sussex, won’t wear it, and San Francisco and Norway both banned it, joining Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Germany, and Japan.

PETA’s 2013 exposé of the angora wool industry, which revealed that rabbits scream in pain as they’re stretched across boards and their hair is torn out, led more than 330 brands worldwide to ban angora. These include the world’s three largest retailers—H&M, Gap Inc., and Inditex (which owns Zara)—as well as Stella McCartney, Topshop, ASOS, Forever 21, Ralph Lauren, and Italian luxury designer Gucci. Just one year after we released the video footage, exports were down 85 percent—numbers are now so low that trade information databases have stopped tracking angora. PETA’s campaign has decimated the industry.

PETA’s 2018 video exposé of the mohair industry—which was the world’s first behind-the-scenes look into it—revealed egregious abuse in South Africa, the world’s top mohair producer. After learning from PETA that mohair is stolen from terrified angora goats—who are often cut open during shearing, dragged, thrown by the legs and tails, and mutilated before being killed—more than 300 brands around the world banned the fiber. Inditex, Zara, Topshop, Gap, H&M, ASOS, Ralph Lauren, Diane von Furstenberg, Brooks Brothers, Crate & Barrel, Esprit, Forever 21, Express, and UNIQLO are just a few of the kind companies to do so.

In a monumental victory for animals, Chanel became the first major high-end fashion brand to ban exotic skins—including those from crocodiles, lizards, and snakes! Fashion icon and designer Victoria Beckham also pledged to stop using exotic skins in her designs, and luxury clothing brand Diane von Furstenberg pledged to stop using them as well. These victories follow decades of pressure from PETA and mean that countless animals will be spared a miserable life and a painful, violent death.

Following Israel’s historic ban on “shackle and hoist” beef imports, the largest U.S. kosher certifier, the Orthodox Union (OU), announced that it would no longer accept beef from slaughterhouses that use that archaic and cruel method of kosher slaughter. The OU said that roughly one-third of the kosher beef that it certifies for import into the U.S. comes from South America—where PETA has conducted three investigations documenting the painful method.

AirBridgeCargo Airlines enacted a policy banning the transportation of monkeys to laboratories anywhere in the world following a campaign in which tens of thousands of PETA supporters contacted the airline to urge it to stop participating in this sordid trade. On these types of flights, monkeys who were bred on squalid factory farms or taken from their families in the wild are crammed into small wooden crates and transported to laboratories, where they endure all manner of torment and are denied everything that’s natural and important to them.

Following a PETA appeal, South Korea stopped requiring that dogs be subjected to a yearlong pesticide poisoning test. Japan, Canada, the EU, and the U.S. also eliminated this cruel test following discussions with PETA scientists, sparing thousands of dogs.

Dove—one of the world’s most widely available personal care–product brands—bans all tests on animals anywhere in the world and is added to PETA’s Beauty Without Bunnies cruelty-free companies list. In addition, Unilever—which owns the Dove brand—bans all tests on animals not required by law for the rest of its products and is added to PETA’s list of companies “Working for Regulatory Change,” a category that recognizes businesses that test on animals only when explicitly required to do so by law, are transparent with PETA about any tests on animals that have been conducted and why, and work diligently to promote the development, validation, and acceptance of non-animal methods.

Following a PETA Asia exposé of an elephant polo tournament in Thailand, PETA and our affiliates persuade a dozen companies—including IBM, Johnnie Walker, and Vespa—to drop their sponsorships. The tournament’s organizing body later announced that it won’t seek another permit, effectively putting an end to elephant polo in the country.

As a result of PETA’s campaign—which led Jack Daniel’s, State Farm, Wells Fargo, and others to end their sponsorships of the cruel Iditarod—The Coca-Cola Company cut ties with the embattled race. The 2019 field of mushers is the smallest since 1989.

Procter & Gamble’s iconic Herbal Essences brand is added to PETA’s Beauty Without Bunnies list of cruelty-free companies. And even though Herbal Essences is sold in China, where tests on animals are required for many products, the brand has worked within Chinese regulations to make sure that such tests will not be done on its products. Over the years, Procter & Gamble has shown a major commitment to ending the use of animals in tests wherever and whenever possible and has worked for years to develop and promote non-animal methods.

In the first South Korea prosecutions of their kind, a supervisor, a worker, and the Jeju Livestock Cooperative were fined for killing horses in front of each other, following PETA’s investigation into the beatings and killing of racehorses at South Korea’s largest horse slaughterhouse. In addition, the Korea Racing Authority created a retirement plan and started funding a program to reduce the number of horses going from the racetrack to the dinner table.

Brazil no longer requires a year-long pesticide poisoning test on dogs after hearing from PETA scientists, pesticide companies, and others that this experiment is unethical and unscientific. Brazil joins the U.S., Canada, the European Union, Japan and South Korea in dropping this test.

After 20 years of PETA’s protests, campaigns, and dedicated scientific work, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announces that it will stop funding and requesting tests on mammals by 2035 and allocate millions of dollars to fund the development of non-animal test methods. When PETA first started working on regulatory testing issues in 1998, animal rights organizations weren’t included as stakeholders and many researchers believed that we would never see an end to animal tests. This commitment from the EPA shows that PETA’s persistent push for ethics and good science have caused a shift in thinking, and we now have a roadmap to the end of animal testing.

Following decades of pressure from PETA and hundreds of thousands of letters from our supporters, Macy’s banned fur! PETA’s campaign urging Macy’s to go fur-free started back in the 1980s—when we made it our prime target for Fur-Free Friday and activists were arrested for blocking the doors at its Herald Square store in New York and for disrupting its Thanksgiving Day Parade.

A Taiwan court ruled against pigeon racers and organizers, concluding a four-year battle following a PETA investigation. At least 239 people faced prison or fines—the most ever prosecuted as a result of a single PETA investigation. More than a million pigeons die in Taiwan every year after they’re released in the middle of the ocean and forced to fly back home, even in typhoon-strength winds.

A federal court ruled in PETA’s favor on every issue presented at trial in PETA’s lawsuit against Tri-State Zoological Park, holding that the Maryland roadside zoo violated the Endangered Species Act by failing to provide animals with adequate veterinary care, sanitation, companionship, and enrichment. Tri-State, which the judge described as “fetid and dystopic,” is now prohibited from owning or possessing endangered or threatened species in the future, and the surviving big cats—two tigers and a lion—were transferred to an accredited sanctuary.

Dillan—a morbidly obese Asiatic black bear suffering from painful and life-threatening dental disease—was rescued from a small concrete cage at a Pennsylvania hunting club. He received the treatment that he desperately needed at The Wild Animal Sanctuary in Colorado, where he hibernated for the first time ever, and is now enjoying a beautiful habitat with acres to forage and explore with his new companion, a PETA-rescued bear named Lily. Since 2012, PETA has helped rescue over 70 bears.

SeaWorld agrees to stop making trainers stand on dolphins’ faces and ride on their backs as though they were surfboards in cruel and demeaning circus-style shows. This victory follows a months-long PETA campaign that included a veterinary report, a shareholder question posed by Alec Baldwin, a shareholder resolution, numerous local ads, and e-mails from more than 133,000 of our members and supporters.

For the first time ever, a Scottish wool farmer pleaded guilty to cruelty to animals. A PETA Asia investigator had recorded him punching sheep in the face and threatening to slit their throats.

A shearer who was caught on camera punching sheep and beating them in the face with heavy electric clippers during PETA’s 13 th exposé of the wool industry pleaded guilty to cruelty to animals in Victoria, Australia, which is a leading exporter of wool to the U.S.

After almost a decade in the making, a ban on the unattended tethering of dogs was passed in Halifax County, North Carolina. This new ordinance will be a game changer for the countless dogs suffering on chains in this large rural county. PETA worked closely with commissioners and law-enforcement officials to make this happen and spread the word with eye-catching billboards, fliers, radio ads, and more.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency no longer requires a test in which birds are fed pesticide-laced food for days before being killed, sparing approximately 700 mallards and quails each year, after a paper the agency co-authored with the PETA International Science Consortium Ltd. showed that the test does not help protect the environment.

In a landmark victory for horses, the Chicago City Council passes a ban on cruel and dangerous horse-drawn carriage rides, making the Windy City the largest city in the country to ban the archaic industry. PETA supported the Chicago Alliance for Animals’ push for a progressive ban every step of the way.

Funding from the PETA International Science Consortium Ltd. contributed towards the creation of a first-of-its-kind 3D model of the deepest part of human lung. The model can be used to study the effects of inhaling different kinds of chemicals, nanomaterials, pathogens, and (e-)cigarette smoke, preventing tens of thousands of rats and mice from being confined to small tubes and forced to inhale them for hours, even repeatedly over several months, before being killed.

The dominos of the big-cat cub-petting industry continued to fall as a result of PETA victories in the courtroom. PETA was two for two against cub petting, winning lawsuits against exhibitors who violated the Endangered Species Act (ESA) with their practices of separating cubs from their mothers and using them in public encounters. These victories allowed PETA to rescue 33 more big cats from three cub-petting facilities—all of which have subsequently shut down—and to set the first-ever federal precedent holding that prematurely separating big-cat cubs from their mothers, declawing them, and using them for public encounters are violations of the ESA. Since 2017, PETA has rescued a total of 75 big cats from roadside zoos. The message to all big-cat abusers is clear: With PETA on the case, their days of exploiting animals are numbered.

After a first-of-its-kind undercover PETA investigation of one of the world’s largest alpaca wool producers revealed that crying alpacas were roughly shorn, cut open, and left bleeding from deep wounds, we persuaded major companies—including UNIQLO, Overstock.com, and ESPRIT—to make the compassionate decision to ban alpaca wool.

Following a strong PETA campaign and e-mails from more than 280,000 of our supporters, the world’s leading beauty retailer, Sephora, bans fur eyelashes. This causes several beauty and eyelash companies to follow suit, including Velour, Coco Mink Lashes, and GladGirl. PETA had pointed out that fur used in false eyelashes typically comes from fur farms, where stressed animals frantically pace, circle endlessly, and gnaw on their own bodies inside cramped wire cages—until they’re gassed or electrocuted or their necks are broken.

A new Virginia law prohibits keeping dogs tethered during certain weather conditions. Since 2016, PETA has worked closely with legislators, testifying in behalf of dogs kept tethered and vigorously lobbying for bills to protect them from cruelty and neglect. While we wish all dogs lived indoors with loving families, this law will help protect those forced to live outside.

After PETA shares a horrifying video exposé of China’s badger-brush industry with companies, nearly 100 brands worldwide—including Morphe, NARS Cosmetics, and Sherwin-Williams—ban badger hair. PETA Asia’s investigation had revealed that in order to make makeup, paint, and shaving brushes, workers confine badgers inside small wire cages on farms. Slaughterhouse workers beat crying badgers over the head with a chair leg and slit their throats.

ExxonMobil—a major Iditarod sponsor, giving $250,000 a year—confirms that 2021 will be the last year that it will sponsor the death race. Shortly thereafter, Craft Sportswear, Medical Park Family Care, and Anchorage Distillery drop their sponsorships as well. These victories follow the 2020 termination of sponsorships by Alaska Airlines, Baird Private Wealth Management, and Chrysler’s Anchorage dealership. The Iditarod has lost $350,000—nearly half—of its prize money in recent years as public condemnation of the race has grown.


2014-2016: Ag-Gag Laws

Each year, Animal Legal Defense Fund provides resources to help its student chapters focus on a specific priority issue. The Student Chapter Program Guide contains an overview of the issue, Animal Legal Defense Fund&rsquos involvement, and suggested activities, such as film screening suggestions, a reading list, and suggested speakers. This year&rsquos priority issue is Ag-Gag legislation .

Animal abuse, food safety violations, and illegal and life-threatening working conditions are rampant on facilities that farm and slaughter animals. Undercover investigations have exposed egregious animal cruelty, such as workers kicking, beating, and dragging cows, pigs, and chickens, and slitting their throats while they are fully conscious. Investigations have also shed light on common agricultural practices that cause animals to suffer significantly, such as removing animals&rsquo testicles, tails, horns, beaks, or toes without anesthesia confining animals in spaces so small they cannot turn around , extend their wings, or lie down comfortably grinding male chicks alive and taking calves away from their mothers mere moments after birth. The abuse farmed animals suffer is simply out of step with most Americans&rsquo values&mdashand rather than helping industry hide these cruel practices, lawmakers should focus on ending them. Not a single federal law protects farmed animals from abuse or neglect during their lives on farms, and many states exclude &ldquocommon agricultural practices&rdquo from criminal anti-cruelty laws. Without undercover investigations, there are no effective watchdogs protecting animals from abuse in these facilities.

According to a poll conducted by an independent third party, more than two-thirds of Americans support undercover investigations by animal protection organizations. In the last decade, animal protection advocates have conducted more than 80 such investigations at animal farms in the United States, and they have uncovered horrific abuse. For example, an investigation by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) revealed multiple beatings of pigs with metal rods and workers sticking clothespins into pigs&rsquo eyes and faces. A supervisor was filmed kicking a young pig in the face, abdomen, and genitals to make her move and told the investigator, &ldquoMake her cry.&rdquo The animal agriculture industry wants to keep millions of Americans in the dark and hide the ugly truth about what happens behind the closed doors of animal farms.

Similar investigations have resulted in criminal animal cruelty convictions recalls of tainted meat plant closures citations for environmental and labor violations evidence of health code violations and civil lawsuits&mdashall of which make undercover investigations and reporting an absolute necessity for protecting animals and public health and safety. Perhaps even more importantly, these investigations have drastically changed the public conversation about the treatment of farmed animals. Journalistic exposés of the animal agriculture industry have led to landmark food safety laws such as the Federal Meat Inspection Act and the Pure Food and Drug Act. These laws help protect the public from the dangers of eating animal products, such as &ldquomad cow&rdquo disease, E. coli, and salmonella .

But to the agriculture industry, the exposure of how animals are truly treated on farms and in slaughterhouses is a threat to profits. Rather than stop abusing the animals in its care, the industry has instead chosen to keep consumers uninformed by aggressively pushing for Ag-Gag legislation that makes undercover investigations illegal&mdasha classic case of shooting the messenger. These laws are designed to thwart the collection of evidence of wrongdoing, thereby &ldquogagging&rdquo reporters and whistle-blowers from exposing the facts. Yet the U.S. Constitution protects free speech and freedom of the press, including journalistic exposés of the abuse animals endure when they are raised for food.

Since 2010, about half of the 50 states&rsquo legislatures have introduced at least 35 Ag-Gag bills at the behest of agricultural interests attempting to silence whistle blowing in a variety of ways. So far, a broad coalition of animal protection, free speech, labor, and journalism organizations has been successful at defeating these measures, and only eight of those bills were enacted into law in the following states: Kansas, Montana, North Dakota, Iowa, Utah, Missouri, Idaho, and North Carolina

The restrictions proposed in these Ag-Gag bills have ranged from making it illegal to photograph or videotape at agricultural facilities (or even to possess or distribute such footage), to criminalizing what one says on a job application, to mandating that anyone with evidence of farmed animal cruelty to report it immediately &ndash forcing investigators to reveal themselves and thereby making it impossible to document larger, systematic patterns of abuse. In some instances, like in Idaho, the penalties for violating the Ag-Gag law were greater than for the animal cruelty that could be documented by an investigation.

Animal Legal Defense Fund&rsquos Lawsuits Challenging Ag-Gag Laws

The Animal Legal Defense Fund has filed suit in Utah and Idaho challenging the constitutionality of Ag-Gag laws. The public relies on journalists and activists to expose abusive and unsafe practices in farmed animal facilities. Our Constitution grants us the right to free speech, including the right to bring animal cruelty to light.

Our lawsuit in Utah is the first to challenge the constitutionality of Ag-Gag laws. This state law (Utah Code Ann. §76-6-112) makes recording the truth about agricultural operations a crime, even for reporters investigating criminal animal abuse and violations of food safety and other laws. The lawsuit was filed on behalf of Animal Legal Defense Fund, PETA, undercover investigations consultant Daniel Hauff, and Amy Meyer, who was the first person in the nation to be prosecuted under an Ag-Gag law. Meyer was charged under Utah&rsquos Ag-Gag law in February 2014 after videotaping operations at Dale Smith Meatpacking Company in Utah from the roadside. Her charges were dropped after public outcry.

In October 2013, Utah filed a motion to dismiss the case, claiming the plaintiffs lacked legal standing and failed to adequately allege violations of the Constitution. In the response to the motion to dismiss , filed in December 2013, Animal Legal Defense Fund and the other plaintiffs defended their right to bring the case, pointing out that the threat of prosecution chills their ability to expose the realities of raising animals for consumption. The opposition also explained why the Utah legislature&rsquos vitriolic motivation for passing the Ag-Gag law violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution, and why federal laws designed to promote whistle-blowing should preempt state attempts to silence whistle-blowers. In August 2014, the court denied Utah&rsquos motion to dismiss the case and allowed most of the lawsuit to move forward.

In March of 2014, Animal Legal Defense Fund and a coalition of civil liberties, animal protection, and consumer groups filed a federal suit over the controversial Idaho Ag-Gag law . The lawsuit challenges the constitutionality of this law (Idaho Code sec. 18-7042) and was filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of Idaho by Animal Legal Defense Fund, PETA, the American Civil Liberties Union of Idaho (ACLU), and the Center for Food Safety (CFS).

Like other Ag-Gag laws, Idaho&rsquos statute criminalizes whistle-blowing investigations at farmed animal facilities, and specifically targets animal advocates who expose illegal and cruel practices. Idaho&rsquos Ag-Gag law prohibits anyone from taking photos or videos at an animal farm or slaughterhouse without the owner&rsquos express consent. In the spring of 2014, Idaho filed a motion to dismiss the lawsuit. Animal Legal Defense Fund, PETA, ACLU, and CFS filed a response to the motion to dismiss and argued the issue in court in June. In September 2014, the court denied the State of Idaho&rsquos motion to dismiss the lawsuit, and decided that ALDF and the coalition could move forward against Idaho and its Ag-Gag law.

In November of 2014, ALDF and the coalition filed a motion for summary judgment , arguing that they were entitled to judgment in their favor because as a matter of law, the statute violates their right to free speech and other rights protected by the U.S. Constitution. In April 2015, the court heard oral arguments in the case .

In a landmark victory for Animal Legal Defense Fund and the coalition, the U.S. District Court for the District of Idaho held in August 2015 that the Ag-Gag law violates the First and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution . This marks the first time a court has declared an Ag-Gag statute unconstitutional. The court ruled that the statute violates the First Amendment by suppressing speech that criticizes animal farms and was motivated by unconstitutional animus against animal advocates&mdashwhich is a violation of the Equal Protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment . This decision is an important first step to defeating similar Ag-Gag laws across the country .

Suggested Projects, Events, and Actions

NOTE: To help fund your event, your chapter can apply for a student chapter project grant .

Education and Outreach

Organize an information table on campus to raise awareness about issues relating to Ag-Gag laws, like the abuse that farmed animals endure when they are being raised and slaughtered for consumption. Animal Legal Defense Fund can provide free tabling materials that include newsletters, stickers, brochures (such as our Farmed Animals and the Law and Factory Farms and Ag-Gag Laws brochures), and posters to help with your event.

Take Action to Stop Ag-Gag Laws Across the U.S.

Seven states still have Ag-Gag laws on the books: Kansas, Montana, North Dakota, Iowa, Utah, Missouri and North Carolina. You can help by contacting lawmakers and asking them to repeal these laws.

Host a speaker, debate, panel, or even a symposium or conference on issues relating to Ag-Gag laws.

When planning a speaker panel or other event, we encourage you to look for opportunities to team up with other student groups. This will bring a wider audience to your event. For example, on the issues relating to Ag-Gag laws, your chapter might pair up with the Environmental Law Society, the National Lawyers Guild, the American Constitution Society, or the American Civil Liberties Union.

Letter Writing and Commenting

Have chapter members write letters in response to any newspaper, magazine, or online article involving Ag-Gag laws and make the case for greater transparency in animal agriculture, not less.

Include news relating to Ag-Gag laws or your events on this issue in your chapter newsletters or emails.

Become Active in State Legislation

Organize your members to write letters and make follow-up phone calls regarding pending legislation in your state.

Screen films related to farmed animal treatment and abuse, undercover investigations, or Ag-Gag laws.

    by the Animal Legal Defense Fund. (2015) on Law 360. (2010) by Cynthia Hodges, Animal Legal & Historical Center. (2011) by Elizabeth Overcash, Animal Legal & Historical Center. (2014) by Nicole Herft.
    on Green is the New Red. on Rolling Stone . on Mother Jones . (2013) on AlterNet. on the New York Times . on The Atlantic . (2012) by Cody Carlson, on VegNews . (2009) on Time .
  • Matthew Liebman , senior attorney, Animal Legal Defense Fund
    • Attorney on Animal Legal Defense Fund&rsquos Ag-Gag cases in Utah and Idaho
    • Attorney on Animal Legal Defense Fund&rsquos Ag-Gag cases in Utah and Idaho
    • Attorney for PETA on Animal Legal Defense Fund&rsquos joint Ag-Gag cases in Utah and Idaho
    • Dismissed plaintiff in Animal Legal Defense Fund&rsquos Ag-Gag case in Utah
    • Plaintiff and counsel in Animal Legal Defense Fund&rsquos Ag-Gag case in Idaho

    Please note: non-Animal Legal Defense Fund speakers may require an honoraria, which we do not fund.


    Tyson Sued For Pretending It’s a Responsible, Ethical Company

    Two groups are angry at Tyson for its feints towards positive environmental practices.

    Labeling of food is a minefield the FDA has many rules about what companies can and cannot say on their packaging and in their advertising, but there are combine-sized holes through which companies can drive.

    We’ve written before about the word “natural” or “all-natural,” which can be printed on packages by anyone, at any time, for any reason or for no reason at all. That’s just one of the many ways that companies, especially agribusiness giants, can make themselves appear more in line with progressive food ideals than they actually are. And now, Tyson is getting sued for it .

    As Americans become steadily more conscious of where our food comes from, there’s increasing pressure on producers to cater to those desires. Sometimes, that pressure can effect actual change sometimes, companies would prefer to keep their costs where they’ve always been, and just adopt the veneer of respectability. A chicken company, for example, might advertise that it’s “hormone-free” or “raised without hormones.” This is perfectly legal to print, but highly misleading. After all, it is completely illegal for any chicken, organic or conventional, to be given hormones.

    The Organic Consumers Association and Food & Water Watch, two activist groups, have joined together to file a lawsuit against Tyson Foods , alleging misleading tactics. They do not seek monetary restitution, instead asking for all offending language to be removed from packaging and advertising materials.

    These groups find issue with several of the ways Tyson markets itself. In one video, a Tyson representative calls the company “stewards of the land.” Tyson’s website uses the phrases “commitment to conservation” and “dedication to environmental leadership.” In Instagram posts, the company has used the hashtag “#sustainable.” Another video finds a Tyson representative saying, “We’re stewards of the animals we raise. It’s our responsibility to take care of them as humanely as possible.”

    These claims, while vague (how would you even measure if someone is a “steward of the land”?), imply, says the lawsuit, that Tyson’s operations are conducted with an emphasis on environmental sustainability and humane treatment of birds. But that, of course, is not the case Tyson has earned fines for dumping waste into the Chesapeake Bay waterway, another for dumping into a Missouri river and killing lots of fish, and more. The company’s animal welfare program is full of similar problems, including recently being caught in an animal cruelty scandal in Virginia .

    Whether this is a winnable suit is a matter left to the courts, but certainly it also aims to bring attention to the problem of food labeling and marketing in the United States. Heavy implications of responsibility aren’t the same thing as actual responsibility should companies be allowed to conflate them?


    Sunday, January 23, 2011

    Open season on cats. and lawmakers. in Utah!

    Well, here's another head-scratcher.

    Now, I realize that on a continuum of conservative thought, Utah ranks somewhere between "extremely" and "unabashedly", but conservative just doesn't have to mean backward and cruel.

    So what exactly was Rep. Curt Oda thinking last week when he proposed a bill that it would make it legal for ordinary citizens to kill feral animals - including cats - by shooting. not to mention clubbing and even decapitating?

    There's no mention of how one is supposed to tell whether that canine in your driveway is really wild or just your next door neighbor's lab off-leash. Details!

    Of course, the measure does say the killing has to be done "humanely". Now maybe the good legislator thought that would make it ok, but he (thankfully) appears to be in the minority, if not alone, in that thought. It's triggered a rash of rather critical commentary from all corners of the blogosphere. and even a few threats that seem to suggest giving Rep. Oda a taste of his own medicine.

    The Utah legislature is back in session tomorrow. Let's hope the rest of the lawmakers have a little more sense.


    Contents

    Litigation [ edit ]

    The Animal Legal Defense Fund goes to court for animals. From filing high-impact lawsuits to providing amicus curiae briefs, its litigation work is a primary tool in the work to advance the interests of animals. The Animal Legal Defense Fund's team of expert staff attorneys may bring suit themselves, or it may retain outside counsel for representation. Its civil actions on behalf of animals often include filing amicus curiae briefs arguing the case for recognition of the bonds between humans and nonhuman animals, and filing formal complaints against government agencies charged with enforcing laws meant to protect animals.

    Criminal justice [ edit ]

    The Animal Legal Defense Fund's Criminal Justice Program is staffed by attorneys, including former prosecutors, with expertise in animal protection law who provide free legal assistance to prosecutors, law enforcement, and veterinarians handling animal cruelty cases. It also works with state legislators to strengthen criminal animal protection laws.

    Animal law [ edit ]

    The Animal Legal Defense Fund's Animal Law Program works closely with law students and law professionals to advance the emerging field of animal law. Moving toward the day when animal law is part of the curriculum at each and every law school, the Animal Law Program collaborates with students, faculty, and school administrations to facilitate the development of animal law courses and assists students in forming Animal Legal Defense Fund Student Chapters.

    Pro bono [ edit ]

    Working to expand the practice and understanding of animal law in the legal community, the Animal Legal Defense Fund partners with attorneys and pro bono coordinators across the country. The program utilizes these volunteers to support the Animal Legal Defense Fund's litigation, criminal justice, and legislative goals. The Animal Legal Defense Fund also works to expand the practice and understanding of animal law in the legal community by delivering presentations at law firms and state bar association events and keeping volunteers updated on the latest cases, animal law conferences, and continuing legal education opportunities.

    Legislation [ edit ]

    The Animal Legal Defense Fund works at the state and local levels to advance important legislation. The Legislative Affairs Program advocates for laws that promote or protect the lives and interests of animals and opposes legislation that would be detrimental to animals’ well-being.


    Pet Defense

    Join the Crusade Against HSUS Anti-pet, Anti-animal Laws and Pass it Forward!

    The HSUS received over 4,500 letters from concerned citizens re the HSUS lobbying nationwise, while acting as a “charity” with their own PAC (pol action committee)…charities are limited in scope to the amount of lobbying they can do. Yet HSUS was doing lobbying 24/7 and although Whiney Wayne was bragging about HSUS doing it, the HSUS PAC didn’t seem to have borders, but are supposed to be distinctly and completely two separate entities. Or should have been. HSUS, as we noted weeks ago, has changed its entire website in an attempt to take off all of the legislation and legislative primers, the bragging and lawsuits, the political lobbying pages, the lobbying done with churches, neighborhood watch groups, local government and SPCA humane groups, Maddie’s Fund, and hundreds more involving lobbying nationwide.

    So guess where HSUS $$ went/goes? Only 1/2 of ONE (1) % went directly to any shelters/pets —but HSUS ads on TV make it look like all of their $$ is going there.

    Deception for $$. If HSUS told people it was going to the same agenda as PETA has —would they get any $$. PETA cannot pass legislation, but HSUS CAN—— but a severe RICO lawsuit against HSUS and ASPCA et al, and humanewatch.org DAILY reporting on HSUS sponsors, and the IRS publicly working on HSUS issues spells BIG obstacles for HSUS credibility.

    Subject: [SAOVA_West] Spay Neuter HSUS Campaign Update !

    A SAOVA message to sportsmen, farmers and pet owners concerned about protecting their traditions, avocations and livelihoods from anti-hunting, anti-breeding, animal guardianship advocates. Forwarding and cross posting, with attribution, encouraged.

    Dear SAOVA friends, Today we received some good news from lobbyist and attorney, Frank Losey, regarding the Campaign to Spay and Neuter HSUS . Frank worked for over 2 years and has compiled 755 pages of documents and proof of the excessive lobbying activities of HSUS. His call to action for animal owners and enthusiasts to write letters to the tax fraud office of IRS resulted in thousands of letters from all 50 states.

    Frank’s work and your efforts have not gone unnoticed by the IRS. Below is Frank’s message. Cross posting is encouraged . Susan Wolf Sportsmen’s and Animal Owners’ Voting Alliance – http://saova.orgIssue lobbying and working to identify and elect supportive legislators

    Dear Animal Owners and Enthusiasts, A number of individuals who wrote to the IRS have now received form a form letter response from the IRS Office in Dallas. Since some have received the form letters, that indicates that all will. Typing names and addresses on 4,500-5,000 form letters and envelopes does take a little time!! Although form letters are often not worth the paper they are written on, this form letter is different for a number of reasons, including those set out below:

    1. Unlike most form letters which are signed by a lower ranking individual, this form letter is signed by the Acting Director of the Exempt Organization Examinations Division . 2. The IRS bureaucratic glacier is now moving. 3. The form letter goes one step further and asks for other relevant info if you have it. 4. The fact that the Dallas Office is involved means that a total of four IRS (Fraud-Related) Offices are now discussing among themselves what is going on. (The other three Offices are Ogden, Utah, Fresno, CA and Washington DC.)

    Discussion means that the IRS is taking serious the documentation that I have previously sent, as well as at least 4,500 confirmed letters that the IRS has received. 5. If the IRS is sending out form letters to at least 4,500 letter-writers, which states send more info if you have it, this means that the IRS is about to open up a serious investigation, and probably already has, especially in light of the fact the HSUS has taken off of its website some of its “finger tip” links having to do with lobbying . You now have to use the HSUS search engine.

    6. I have a new point of contact to inundate with 755 pages of incriminating documents, in the unlikely event that my seven submissions have not been copied and forwarded to the Dallas Office. 7. The IRS “chatter,” which was a primary purpose of the letter writing campaign, is in full motion. 8. The most important thing is that the IRS is not ignoring the issues raised and is asking for additional information if it is available. I’m working on that!! A HUGE “THANK YOU” TO ALL WHO WROTE TO THE IRS. Frank Losey


    Anti-whistleblower ag-gag bills hide factory farming abuses from the public

    Time and again, undercover investigations and whistleblowers have documented rampant animal cruelty and other abuses in our nation’s factory farms and slaughterhouses. But instead of working to solve those problems, Big Ag is trying to simply cover them up.

    Whistleblowing employees have long played a vital role in exposing animal abuse, unsafe working conditions and environmental crimes in industrialized animal agriculture. In 1906, Upton Sinclair published The Jungle, an inside look at the horrors of the Chicago meat industry. This eye-opening novel was a major factor in passing the Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act.

    Americans today are still highly concerned about the animal suffering, food safety violations and pollution caused by corporate meat, egg and dairy production. But factory farming lobbyists are pressuring state legislators nationwide to pass “ag-gag” laws aimed at intimidating and punishing the whistleblowers, investigators and journalists who are exposing these issues.

    What do ag-gag bills do?

    These bills take various forms, including:

    • Banning photos or videos of a factory farm taken without permission from the owner.
    • Making it a crime for an undercover investigator to get work at a factory farm.
    • Requiring that any violations be immediately reported. (That may sound like a noble idea, but it’s actually intended to prevent whistleblowers from establishing a pattern of abuse. Because of the power of the factory farming lobby, prosecutors will rarely file charges for farm animal cruelty unless a pattern has been established and the evidence is overwhelming.)

    What does the factory farming lobby have to hide anyway?

    Dozens of investigations have shown appalling animal cruelty in the meat, egg and dairy industries. For example:

    • The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) exposé of calf abuse at a Vermont slaughter plant led to the plant's closure and a felony criminal conviction.
    • An HSUS investigation of a cow slaughter plant in California prompted the largest meat recall in U.S. history and criminal convictions. Many of the cows were too sick to even stand up. Undercover video footage showed the sick cows being dragged by chains or pushed by forklifts to be slaughtered. A significant amount of the meat from this slaughterhouse was headed to the National School Lunch Program.
    • The HSUS’s investigation of Wyoming Premium Farms documented workers punching and kicking mother pigs and piglets, resulting in cruelty charges against nine workers.

    In the past, lawmakers backed by animal agribusiness have introduced ag-gag bills in dozens of states. The vast majority of these bills have been defeated by the Humane Society of the United States and other organizations seeking to protect consumers’ right to know where their food comes from. Pressure from the public and newspaper editorial boards have also been instrumental in stopping ag-gag bills.

    Of the handful of bills that did become law, six have already been struck down by courts because they infringe on the First Amendment. Taxpayers in Iowa, Utah and Idaho are being forced to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to plaintiffs because politicians in their states passed unconstitutional ag-gag laws under pressure from the factory farming lobby.

    It is said that the best disinfectant is daylight. Whistleblowing employees and animal welfare advocates such as the HSUS Investigations Team are on the frontlines of exposing the worst abuses in factory farms, laboratories and puppy mills.

    Photo and video evidence not only presents a powerful case against cruel industries, but also provides a shield of protection for employees with the courage to speak out who might otherwise be intimidated or fired if going through traditional complaint reporting channels.

    Who opposes anti-whistleblower bills?

    The Humane Society of the United States and more than 70 other nonprofit groups defending civil liberties, food safety, the environment, animal welfare, workers' rights and journalism strongly oppose anti-whistleblower ag-gag bills.


    Watch the video: 29821 Ώρα 19:00 στο Σύνταγμα. Όλοι μαζί ενωμένοι! (September 2021).