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Tip: Blender and Mason Jar

Tip: Blender and Mason Jar


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How to use a mason jar with your blender to whip or chop things right into the jar.

Photography Credit:Elise Bauer

Did you know that many, if not most, blenders can be used with a standard mason jar, or wide-mouthed mason jar?

This is a trick my mother taught me. Apparently 40 years ago or so, about the time this blender pictured was bought, manufacturers used to include a mason jar in the box with the blender.

Mom recalls even a booklet that listed the many things one could make with the mason jar blender, including ground spices, whipped cream, and peanut butter.

We use this trick most often to make whipped cream. The blender whips it right in the jar, so if we have extra, it’s already in a jar for storage. And it is easier when it comes to making small quantities.

I was complaining the other day that I needed a spice grinder. My mother reminded me of the mason jar trick and it worked perfectly.

Here’s how to do it. I’m using walnuts to demonstrate, but you could use this trick with just about anything you want to blend, chop, or grind.

Tip: Blender and Mason Jar

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup to 1 cup of shelled nuts
  • Old style blender
  • Mason jar (standard mouth)

Method

Step 1: Remove the base from the regular blender container. Place what you want to chop or blend (up to about a cup of whole shelled nuts) in the blender jar.

Step 2: Screw on the base to the mason jar. Make sure it is nice and tight.

Step 3: Invert the jar and place on the blender.

Step 4: Use as you would a food processor. Pulse or blend to desired degree.

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Immersion Blender Homemade Ranch Dressing and Seasoning Packets

I learned how to make my own homemade mayo and ranch dressing back in 2015 when I was doing a certain elimination diet. Though I’m not into it anymore, the habit of making homemade dressings and sauces STUCK! Don’t get me wrong, I love some good ol’ store-bought ranch to dunk some pizza in every now and again, but there’s something about this homemade version that is SO GOOD!

My original recipe called for coconut milk or almond milk AND fresh herbs. But over the years, I simplified my recipe so you can make it fully with pantry staples (+ an egg). If I happen to have some fresh herbs on hand, I throw them in, but otherwise, I stick to this spice mix! I also started using water to thin it out (instead of any kind of milk) and it’s still creamy and dreamy! It also means I can avoid opening a whole can of coconut milk to use 2 Tbsp - 1/4 cup of it.

A few things to note before we dive in:

PLEASE NOTE that this ranch is made with a raw egg. I have been making it for 4 years now and have never had any issues, but if this makes you uncomfortable for any reason (health issues, pregnancy, etc.), please skip this recipe!

Though the recipe is SUPER easy, it can also be a bit finicky. Keep the following tips in mind to avoid #ranchfails:

For some reason, I have had a couple of #ranchfails when my mason jar was sitting on a cutting board. I don’t have a scientific reason for this but perhaps it introduces some extra vibration? Make sure you’re blending with your jar right on the counter.

Use a jar or container that is only slightly wider than your immersion blender. You want it to fit like a glove. I have had a few #ranchfails when using a wider container, I think because the oil gets pulled in too quickly and doesn’t emulsify!

If things just aren’t coming together and you end up with a super runny mayo, you can try to add another egg and follow the blending steps again (taking it suuuuuper slowly)… but I’ll admit I have just had to toss a few batches!

You need an immersion blender to make this recipe. If you don’t have one, you’ve come to the wrong place. I have this Kitchenaid one.

For any of my buffalo chicken recipes on the blog, you can bet that this is the ranch I’m using!

Feel free to play around with spices and mix-ins! Fresh herbs are nice if you have them. Just remember, if you’re adding liquidy flavorings (salsa, red hot, roasted red peppers), blend them in before thinning with water/milk!

ranch + Frank’s Red Hot = Red Hot Ranch

ranch + avocado = avocado ranch

ranch + salsa = salsa ranch

ranch + roasted red peppers = red pepper ranch

ranch + 1 jalapeno = jalapeno ranch

Since this recipe calls for quite a few different spices, I like to get them out one time and measure out little ranch packets to make my life a bit easier the next time I need to whip up a batch. Such a huge time saver!

I think you will LOVE this recipe because:

You make and store it in a mason jar — fewer dishes… yay!

It’s made using one egg and pantry staples, so you can easily keep everything on-hand.

It’s creamy and delicious and made with simple ingredients.

Immersion Blender Homemade Ranch Dressing and Seasoning Packets


Tip: Blender and Mason Jar

NOTE: I have tried this it's works. My Love-affair with Mason Jars continues.


Posted by Elise on Aug 24, 2005


Did you know that many, if not most, blenders can be used with a standard mason jar, or wide-mouthed mason jar? This is a trick my mother taught me. Apparently 40 years ago or so, about the time this blender pictured was bought, manufacturers used to include a mason jar in the box with the blender. Mom recalls even a booklet that listed the many things one could make with the mason jar blender, including ground spices, whipped cream, and peanut butter. We use this trick most often to make whipped cream. The blender whips it right in the jar, so if we have extra, it's already in a jar for storage. And it is easier when it comes to making small quantities.


I was complaining the other day that I needed a spice grinder. My mother reminded me of the mason jar trick and it worked perfectly. Here's how to do it. I'm using walnuts to demonstrate, but you could use this trick with just about anything you want to blend, chop, or grind.

Step 1: Remove the base from the regular blender container.


Step 2: Screw on the base to the mason jar. Make sure it is nice and tight.


Step 3: Invert the jar and place on the blender.


Step 4: Use as you would a food processor. Pulse or blend to desired degree.


Does Homemade Mayonnaise Taste Good?

I promise you, this mayonnaise tastes just like what you are used to. Don’t be suspicious of it because it is healthy. Want to know how I know? I swapped out the mayonnaise in our house for this homemade mayonnaise and my husband has never noticed. (Until he reads this! Haha!)

We’re both picky about our mayonnaise. Before, I only bought Best Foods. When I’ve tried to save money by buying the generic brand, he could always tell, and refuse to eat it. But his homemade paleo and Whole30 mayonnaise? He couldn’t tell and ate his whole sandwich. And this was a chicken salad sandwich where mayonnaise is crucial!

If it passes the husband taste test, you know it’s good.


The Mason Jar Blender Trick: Do You Know About This?

Sometimes there are kitchen tips that float around on the Internet for years before you bump into them. Sometimes those tips are potentially life-changing. Like this one: did you know that a standard mason jar can be used in place of the pitcher on most blenders? What the what?

If you unscrew the base from your blender pitcher, you’ll see that the blade fits perfectly onto a standard (not wide-mouth) mason jar and the base screws on to hold it securely. Fit it onto the blender and blend away!

There’s a lot of to love about this easy trick. If you’re blending a smoothie, you can drink directly from the jar or put on a lid and take it on the go. I also like the idea of making a few smoothie kits in jars and keeping them in the refrigerator for quick blending in the morning. You can also use jars for blending spices or nuts and even store them in the jar after blending. It basically turns your blender into a DIY Magic Bullet — and saves you from doing a few dishes. Win-win!

Have you ever tried this trick?

Anjali is a former private chef who is currently a full-time nutrition student, with plans to become a registered dietitian. She lives in New Orleans with her husband and toddler. You can read more of her writing at Eat Your Greens.


Mason jars on a blender

apparently, the threads on mason jars and most blenders are the same. I went and verified this with my very normal blender, and sure enough the bottom unscrews from the blender top and fits onto a mason jar just fine.

I think this would be a great way to reduce dishes if you blend things up often. I make my own refried black beans using the blender and this would keep them right in an easy to put in the fridge container!

BucksBrandon wrote:
Stumbled upon this link I thought I'd share:

apparently, the threads on mason jars and most blenders are the same. I went and verified this with my very normal blender, and sure enough the bottom unscrews from the blender top and fits onto a mason jar just fine.

I think this would be a great way to reduce dishes if you blend things up often. I make my own refried black beans using the blender and this would keep them right in an easy to put in the fridge container!

Probably where the person who came up with the idea for the "Magic Bullet" blender got it from. Same concept, closed jar that seals at the bottom (well, its the top until you flip it).

Great tip. I will be buying a new blender soon, and will be certain to take a mason jar with me when I compare makes/models! That option would certainly make it more multi-purpose.

On the border of Zones 5 & 6 on the last 2 acres of what was once a large farm. Flat, flat and more flat!

Hey! thanks for the post, as soon as I read it I ran out to the kitchen and tried to fit my wife's mason jar to the blender!
I'm wizzing and chopping away at whatever I could find, so in went primrose root's for the ducks, not that they wanted it.
She comes in with the usual what are you doing, and I'm like oh didn't you know? hehehe I thought all you mason jar people knew about this, Look wife no flying seeds!

anyways I was pleased with myself and the duck's got a green sludge seedy breakfast they all shook there head's at.

I gotta hit up the homestead forum more often, Out with the blender in with the mason wiz chopper!

Bloom where you are planted.
http://restfultrailsfoodforestgarden.blogspot.com/

I just discovered this trick the other day and worried that the mason jar might break - I did break one the other day by trying to flick the excess chile sauce off a teaspoon inside the mason jar (it was a Ball brand): the teaspoon shattered the jar from the inside out and I was surprised at how easily it broke, and also how thin the glass was.

I've also shattered a plastic Osterizer closed jar that was specifically designed for attachment to a blender knife and base, this time by trying to blend up a small batch of cats claw, which are extremely hard!

Has anyone tried this trick and had the jar break? Or conversely has anyone done this a lot and never had any problems?

Rereading this post I realise I might have discovered a potential new career path for myself in product testing.

Bamboo Builder & Director of "Return to the Forest" courses, Lake Atitlán, Guatemala.

Living in the land of eternal spring: 1600m altitude tropical highlands with warm rainy summers & warm dry winters lots of corn, beans, sweet potatoes, avocado, coffee, hog plums, citrus, bananas and bamboo.


How To Prep And Build A Mason Jar Salad

Mason jars salads are not only convenient, space-efficient ways to have prepped meals, but they are also super cool and trendy. The concept behind the mason jar salad is to place the entire contents of the salad (including the dressing) in the jar without having to worry about everything getting soggy or wilted. You can use large or small mason jars depending on the size of the salad you want to consume.

When it comes to cleansing, it is important to learn what flavors work together. Mangos and avocados taste good with arugula and cucumbers, while apples and raw almond butter are a match made in flavor heaven. We know that it can be difficult to leave old flavors and foods behind, but it is important to experiment with new foods to see what food possibilities are out there.

When it comes to meal prepping salads, it can be difficult because you usually have to pack the dressing in a separate container or bring it with you in a jar. This isn’t the case with mason jar salads because everything is ready to go in one jar. While we are only detailing one recipe in this article, you can use other salad recipes in the Full Body Cleanse Approved recipe section to diversify your flavors for the week. Not only that, this style of meal prep is something you’ll have with you for life after cleansing. Living a healthier life is all about knowing your flavor combinations and adopting methods and tricks that make it easy to live healthily.

Important Structure of Mason Jar Salads:

Yes, there is a specific order you need to follow in order to keep your salads as fresh as possible, especially if you are prepping them for the week. A little tip is to use a wide mouth mason jar to make your life easy. First off, the dressing always goes in first so that it can rest at the bottom. Then you can add ingredients like apples, radishes, celery, or nuts. Finally, the dry ingredients like greens, cucumbers, tomatoes, or carrots go on top.


How to Make a Milkshake

Whether you're a culinary rule-follower who refuses to indulge in off-season meals or the kind of rebel who sips soup in the summer, it's fair to say the appeal of a thick, creamy milkshake transcends all four seasons.

The milkshake goes back to the end of the 19th century where it was once considered an "adult drink" made of eggs and whiskey. By the 1930s, you could find milkshakes in malt shops across the country, ushering in a glorious time in America where drinking your ice cream was as common as smoking a cigarette at the doctor's office.

For those who'd love nothing more than to sip half a carton of ice cream in one sitting, here are a couple of quick and easy recipes for a homemade milkshake that'll satisfy your sweet tooth.

The Blender Method

For the easiest way to make a milkshake a home, all you really need is ice cream, milk and — of course — a blender. Plop four or so scoops of the ice cream of your choice into the blender along with 1/4 cup of milk (or oat milk for a smoother shake). Blend. Once the ice cream reaches a smooth consistency, pour, top with whipped cream and/or a maraschino cherry and enjoy.

Try a Mason Jar

If you live in a household without a blender, you can still make yourself a milkshake with a Mason jar. Scoop some ice cream into a microwave-safe bowl (use the same amount of ice cream and milk as for the blender method if you have a large Mason jar, and halve the recipe for a small one) and place it in the microwave for 30 seconds or until the ice cream is melted. Pour the melted ice cream into the Mason jar, add the milk and/or liquor if it's that kind of night. Screw the top on the Mason jar, shake vigorously, pour into a glass (or drink from the jar) and enjoy!

If You're Looking to Get Fancy

If you want to take your milkshake making to the next level, why not go full-tilt boogie and take the malt house home with a machine built for the job, such as this turquoise green Brentwood Classic Milkshake Maker. Follow the instructions that come with the machine or use the blender method to make a great shake. With a milkshake machine like this, the only hard part is picking out the right flavors.

Pro-tip: Looking for some killer add-ins that'll take your shake to a whole new level? Try adding a scoop of powdered milk for an extra creamy shake or crush up and add a handful of cookies, nuts or cereal for the kind of dessert reminiscent of a DQ Blizzard.

HowStuffWorks may earn a small commission from affiliate links in this article.


36 Fun And Awesome Mason Jar Uses

1. Cooked food

Mason jars are ideal for food storage! Some ideas include:

  • salad in a jar
  • overnight oats, chia puddings, and other breakfasts
  • soups
  • smoothies
  • simple meals with legumes and cooked veggies (like the one underneath)

2. Storage for cloth napkins

Cloth napkins are great, quick cleaning options of dust or spills. They are excellent also if you are sick and you have a lot of boogers!

You can store the clean cloth napkins in a jar, and use them when needed.

3. Storage for DIY plant-based milk

Have you ever tried to make your homemade oat milk? It is the easiest thing, and it is very cheap, too. Or if you prefer, you can make it with nuts, too. Then, you can store the milk in a mason jar.

– soak 100g/1 cup of oats for 5-10 minutes

– wash the oats good (to make the milk less gluey)

– blend with 1l/4 cups of water, in short intervals

– strain with nut milk bag, cheesecloth, or mesh produce bag

4. Spices storage

I bet you’ve seen tons of organized pantries with spices in jars. Yep, probably I’m sharing nothing new, but it’s a cool idea, so I decided to add it!

It looks super cute, but don’t aim for perfection – it will be still great, even if the jars are different sizes and shapes, too.

5. Legumes/grains storage

You can use bigger jars to store and organize your pantry! Put anything and everything, from:

  • beans
  • lentils
  • rice
  • oats
  • flours
  • cornflakes
  • pasta
  • seeds
  • nuts
  • etc.etc.etc

6. Money storage (Piggybank)

Instead of getting a piggybank, start collecting coins in a mason jar. You can even seal up the top and make a hole in the lid, so you will be sure that you won’t take the money out.

You can even have a few mason jar “piggybanks”, and save up for different things!


How To : Use Mason Jars with a Blender

A mason jar is a great way to preserve your food, but did you know that you could use a mason jar with a blender?

Make blended items that can be stored by using a mason jar with your blender.

Step 1: Remove the base of the blender

Remove the base from the blender's pitcher – the threaded base, the gasket, and the blade.

Put whatever you want to blend or process into the mason or mayonnaise jar.

TIP: Always use a glass jar.

Screw the jar to the base of the blender's pitcher, including the gasket and blade, making sure it fits tightly.

TIP: When you screw on the base, the blades should have at least ¼-inch clearance on all sides.

Step 4: Place jar on motor assembly

Place the jar on the blender motor assembly as you would the blender pitcher.

TIP: Use your blender and the mason jar to grind spices or coffee, to whip cream, or to make single serving drinks. When you are done, place a lid on the jar to store the contents.

Turn on the blender or pulse the blades until the food inside the jar is at the desired consistency.

Step 6: Remove jar and then blade

Remove the jar, turn it upright, and remove the blade assembly. Enjoy this efficient new tool for your kitchen.

Did you know? Mason jars were originally developed to withstand the high temperatures necessary for processing pickles.

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Watch the video: Jak pracovat s menší nádobou k mixéru Eva Hájková (November 2022).